Clio Visualizing History

Credits

Image Credits: Politics and Social Movements

Women in Politics: A Very Short History

From The Suffragist, 1915. Public domain.
Woman Suffrage Headquarters in Cleveland, Ohio, 1912. Public domain.
Artwork by B. M. Boye, circa 1913. Public domain.
History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives.
Women members of the U.S. Congress, circa 1970. Seated, Sen. Maurine Newberger, Oregon; Rep. Frances Bolton, Ohio; Sen. Margaret Chase Smith, Maine. Standing, Representatives Florence Dwyer, New Jersey; Martha Griffiths, Michigan; Edith Green, Oregon; Patsy Mink, Hawaii; Leonor Sullivan, Missouri; Julia Hansen, Washington; Edna Kelly, New York; Charlotte Reid, Illinois. Public domain.
First Lady Betty Ford. Photo by Karl Schumacher. Gerald R. Ford Library. Public domain.
Yanker Poster Collection, Library of Congress.
© Freda Leinwand, 1977. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
© Bettye Lane, 1978.
Sandra Day O'Connor. Library of Congress. Public domain.
Shirley Chisholm, 1972. Library of Congress. Public domain.
Geraldine Ferraro. U.S. Congress. Public domain.
History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives.
History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives.
History, Art & Archives, U.S. House of Representatives.
Hillary Rodham Clinton. U.S. Department of State. Public domain.
Sarah Palin. Photo by Gage Skidmore. Creative Commons license.

Women in the Civil Rights Movement

1963 March on Washington, wide-angle view. U.S. Information Agency. National Archives and Records Administration. Public domain.
1963 March on Washington, Lincoln Memorial. U.S. Information Agency. National Archives and Records Administration. Public domain.
Photo by Bryan MacKinnon. Cropped on left side. Creative Commons license.
Rosa Parks with Dr. Martin Luther King, 1955. U.S. Information Agency. National Archives and Records Administration. Public domain.
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) pin. Public domain.

The Revival of Feminism

Eleanor Roosevelt with Esther Peterson, 1962. Franklin D. Roosevelt Library. Public domain.
© Freda Leinwand, 1970. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
© Freda Leinwand, 1970. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Gloria Steinem, 1972. U.S. News & World Report collection donated to Library of Congress with no known restrictions.
Robin Morgan, 1976. © Freda Leinwand. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University

Separate Roads to Feminism

© Freda Leinwand, 1977. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Parents, Families and Friends of Gays and Lesbians, annual Seattle LGBT Pride parade, 1995. Photo by Joe Mabel. Creative Commons license.
© Bettye Lane, 1977.
© Freda Leinwand, 1982. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University

Grassroots Activism and Coalition Building

Yanker Poster Collection, Library of Congress.
© Bettye Lane, 1972.
© Bettye Lane, 1979.
© Freda Leinwand, 1982. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
© Bettye Lane, 1977.
© Freda Leinwand, 1982. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University

Discord Among Women

Yanker Poster Collection, Library of Congress.
Phyllis Schlafly. Library of Congress.
National Women’s Conference in Houston: Billie Jean King, Bella Abzug, Betty Friedan. © Bettye Lane, 1977.
Patsy Mink. U.S. Congress. Public domain.
© Bettye Lane, 1979.
Yanker Poster Collection. Library of Congress.
© Freda Leinwand, 1977. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
© Freda Leinwand, 1977. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Spectators in Florida Senate chambers, 1979. State Archive of Florida. Public domain.
© Freda Leinwand, 1981. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
© Freda Leinwand, 1977. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University

Global Feminism

Artwork by Valentin Brown. Used with permission.
Gender gap index in 2013, calculated by World Economic Forum. The measurements of gender inequality were defined in 2010 by the United Nations Development Programme. Data source: The Global Gender Gap Report, 2013 (PDF). Map graphic by M. Tracy Hunter. Creative Commons license.
One Billion Rising event, Washington DC, 2013. Photo by Elvert Barnes. Creative Commons license.
© Freda Leinwand, 1977. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Poster commemorating the Mirabal Sisters. Donated by Julia Alvarez. More info: The Mariposa DR Foundation
Women weaving traditional tais cloth, East Timor, 1986. Department of Information, Republic of Indonesia. Public domain.
Women’s rights protest in Egypt, 2011. Photo by Al Jazeera English. Creative Commons license.
Schoolgirls in Ghazni City, Afghanistan, 2011. Photo by U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Laura G. Childs. Public domain.
One Billion Rising event, Washington DC, 2013. Photo by Elvert Barnes. Creative Commons license.
Protest in Bangalore, India, 2012. Photo by Jim Ankan Deka. Creative Commons license.
Andrea Dondolo, South African activist, 2013. Photo by UK Department for International Development. Creative Commons license.

How to Navigate our Interactive Timeline

You will find unique content in each chapter’s timeline.

Place the cursor over the timeline to scroll up and down within the timeline itself. If you place the cursor anywhere else on the page, you can scroll up and down in the whole page – but the timeline won’t scroll.

To see what’s in the timeline beyond the top or bottom of the window, use the white “dragger” located on the right edge of the timeline. (It looks like a small white disk with an up-arrow and a down-arrow attached to it.) If you click on the dragger, you can move the whole timeline up or down, so you can see more of it. If the dragger won’t move any further, then you’ve reached one end of the timeline.

Click on one of the timeline entries and it will display a short description of the subject. It may also include an image, a video, or a link to more information within our website or on another website.

Our timelines are also available in our Resource Library in non-interactive format.

Timeline Legend

  1. Yellow bars mark entries that appear in every chapter

  2. This icon indicates a book

  3. This icon indicates a film

1971 The Click! Moment

The idea of the “Click! moment” was coined by Jane O’Reilly. “The women in the group looked at her, looked at each other, and ... click! A moment of truth. The shock of recognition. Instant sisterhood... Those clicks are coming faster and faster. They were nearly audible last summer, which was a very angry summer for American women. Not redneck-angry from screaming because we are so frustrated and unfulfilled-angry, but clicking-things-into-place-angry, because we have suddenly and shockingly perceived the basic disorder in what has been believed to be the natural order of things.” Article, “The Housewife's Moment of Truth,” published in the first issue of Ms. Magazine and in New York Magazine. Republished in The Girl I Left Behind, by Jane O'Reilly (Macmillan, 1980). Jane O'Reilly papers, Schlesinger Library.