Clio Visualizing History

Credits

Image Credits: Workplace and Family

Women’s Work

“Employment ladder,” 1920. Library of Congress. Public domain.
Miner’s wife, 1946. U.S. Department of the Interior. National Archives and Records Administration. Public domain.
Good Housekeeping magazine, 1908. Public domain.
U.S. Employment Service poster, 1943. Library of Congress. Public domain.
© Freda Leinwand, 1977. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Works Progress Administration poster, 1939. Cropped. Public domain.
Works Progress Administration photo, 1939. Public domain.
Works Progress Administration photo, 1940. Public domain.
© Bettye Lane, 1981.
SEIU (Service Employees International Union) office, 1937. Public domain.
© Freda Leinwand, 1970. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Illustration of glass ceilings metaphor: "So c'mon up."
“So c'mon up.” Artwork by  Wendy MacNaughton . Used with permission.
White House security officers. Office of Personnel Management. National Archives and Records Administration. Public domain.
© Freda Leinwand, 1981. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Artwork by Liz Hemingway, courtesy of Vermont Woman newspaper, 1986.
Graphic from “Women-Owned Businesses in the 21st Century,” U.S. Department of Commerce. Full report. Public domain.
© Bettye Lane, 1970.

Challenging Sex Discrimination

© Freda Leinwand, 1982. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Martha Griffiths, 1970. U.S. News and World Report collection, Library of Congress. No known restrictions.
Worker at Richmond Shipyards, 1943. Photo by Ann Rosener, U.S. Office of War Information. Library of Congress. Public domain.
Stewardess, circa 1950. Photo by Chalmers Butterfield. Creative Commons license.
Carpenter. © Freda Leinwand, 1981. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Air traffic controller. © Bettye Lane, 1975.
Police officer. © Freda Leinwand, 1983. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
© Bettye Lane, 1977.
Subway conductor. © Freda Leinwand, 1981. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Coalition of Labor Union Women (CLUW). © Freda Leinwand, 1983. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Women in a law office. © Freda Leinwand, 1979. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Karen Nussbaum. U.S. Department of Labor. Public domain.
Computer operator, circa 1972. Office of Personnel Management. National Archives and Records Administration. Public domain.
Air traffic controllers. © Freda Leinwand, 1982. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Bus driver. © Bettye Lane, 1975.

Changing American Families

Artwork by  Wendy MacNaughton . Used with permission.
Photo by Bill Branson, 1987. National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health. Public domain.
© Freda Leinwand, 1980. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
© Bettye Lane
Photo by Horacio Villalobos, 1974. Environmental Protection Agency. National Archives and Records Administration. Public domain.
Photo by Bill Branson, 1989. National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health. Public domain.
© Bettye Lane, 1974.

Women in the Military

Col. Oveta Culp Hobby (right) and two others serving in the Women's Army Corps. Photo by Al Aumuller, 1943. New York World-Telegram and Sun Newspaper collection, Library of Congress. Public domain.
U.S. Office of War Information, 1945. National Archives and Records Administration. Public domain.
Recuitment poster with Girl Scouts. U.S. Office of War Information, circa 1942. Public domain.
All-women formation, 380th Air Expeditionary Wing, 2010. Photo by Senior Airman Jenifer Calhoun, U.S. Air Force. Public domain.
Lori Piestewa, 2003. U.S. Army. Public domain.
Brigadier General Anne MacDonald, 2010. Photo by NATO Training Mission-Afghanistan. Creative Commons license.
Captain Vernice Armour, U.S. Marine Corps, 2006. Photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Chad McNeeley, U.S. Navy. U.S. Department of Defense. Public domain.
Humvee convoy, Iraq, 2008. Photo by Senior Airman Eric Harris. U.S. Air Force. Public domain.
Airman 1st Class Celeste Smith, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, 2014. Photo by Senior Airman Ashley Taylor. U.S. Air Force. Public domain.
Staff Sergeant Danny Sava, U.S. Marine Corps, and his family, 2006. Photo by Cherie A. Thurlby. U.S. Department of Defense. Public domain.
Petty Officer 3rd Class Leah Stiles, U.S. Navy, and her daughter, 2004. Photo by Petty Officer 3rd Class Campbell. U.S. Navy. Public domain.
U.S. Navy sailor and two WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service), 1950. Los Angeles Times archive, UCLA Library. Public domain.
Rear Admiral Nora W. Tyson, U.S. Navy, at the Women in Military Service for America Memorial, 2013. Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Daniel Hinton. U.S. Department of Defense. Public domain.

Balancing Work and Family

© Bettye Lane, 1973.
Excerpt from Vermont Woman newspaper, 1987. Used with permission.
© Bettye Lane, 1973.
Excerpt from Vermont Woman newspaper, 1987. Used with permission.
© Freda Leinwand, 1982. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
© Freda Leinwand, 1970. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Marian Wright Edelman, 1994. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Public domain.
Yanker Poster Collection, Library of Congress.
© Freda Leinwand, 1983. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
© Freda Leinwand, 1984. The Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University
Sketch by Bob Selby for Clio Visualizing History, Inc.

How to Navigate our Interactive Timeline

You will find unique content in each chapter’s timeline.

Place the cursor over the timeline to scroll up and down within the timeline itself. If you place the cursor anywhere else on the page, you can scroll up and down in the whole page – but the timeline won’t scroll.

To see what’s in the timeline beyond the top or bottom of the window, use the white “dragger” located on the right edge of the timeline. (It looks like a small white disk with an up-arrow and a down-arrow attached to it.) If you click on the dragger, you can move the whole timeline up or down, so you can see more of it. If the dragger won’t move any further, then you’ve reached one end of the timeline.

Click on one of the timeline entries and it will display a short description of the subject. It may also include an image, a video, or a link to more information within our website or on another website.

Our timelines are also available in our Resource Library in non-interactive format.

Timeline Legend

  1. Yellow bars mark entries that appear in every chapter

  2. This icon indicates a book

  3. This icon indicates a film

1971 The Click! Moment

The idea of the “Click! moment” was coined by Jane O’Reilly. “The women in the group looked at her, looked at each other, and ... click! A moment of truth. The shock of recognition. Instant sisterhood... Those clicks are coming faster and faster. They were nearly audible last summer, which was a very angry summer for American women. Not redneck-angry from screaming because we are so frustrated and unfulfilled-angry, but clicking-things-into-place-angry, because we have suddenly and shockingly perceived the basic disorder in what has been believed to be the natural order of things.” Article, “The Housewife's Moment of Truth,” published in the first issue of Ms. Magazine and in New York Magazine. Republished in The Girl I Left Behind, by Jane O'Reilly (Macmillan, 1980). Jane O'Reilly papers, Schlesinger Library.